Natural

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English: Vibram FiveFingers Bikila shoes, top ...
English: Vibram FiveFingers Bikila shoes, top view. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As I heal from my injury, I go out into the Park on a daily basis to walk and test my knee. I started to pay attention to different runner’s running styles. Some people lightly run on their toes and are so light on their feel, so the look like they are floating down the road. Others deem to run wildly down the road flailing their arms or legs about but seem perfectly comfortable in their stride.

When I started running the way we ran was not that much an issue, but with the dawn of the running boom, things became more complicated.

At one point there were many heal strikers and that was supposed to be good for running long distances. Now the trend seems to say that heel strikers are prone to too many injures.

Here are a few running styles that I have considered using. The Pose technique by Dr Nicholas Romanov (http://www.posetech.com/pose_method/pose-method-of-running-technique.html).  This technique is defined on their website as “Efficient, injury-free running taught through poses. Use the Pose Method® of Running technique to prevent injuries and to dramatically improve your running performance.”  This method is where you have a slightly forward motion but you pick your feet up under the body not behind your butt. Therefore you land on the midsole when running.

This method is close to how I try to run. It seem to be easy to replicate. I have found coaches and trainers who tech this method, but I feel it seems easy to pick up.

I first heard of Chi running, when I saw the book by Danny Drever (http://www.chirunning.com). This technique focus on core strength and relaxing. It is supposed to be a natural running style that uses a forward lean to help you to move forward effortlessly. You land on the midsole when using this method also. This method has certified trainers, books and DVDs to help you learn this technique.

I have not tried this one yet, but I’m willing to give anything a try once.

Barefoot running has been something that was out for a long time. There was even a sprinter in the Olympics Zola Budd, who ran races barefoot. This is a simple technique, which is supposed to help keep you injury free because you are not using a heavy shoe that supposedly makes you a heel striker.

I am not necessarily a fan because I am not 90 lbs dripping wet. No that there is anything wrong with people who are 90 lbs, but things are different for me because I am tall and medium build. I am not sure it would be for someone who runs heavy footed or is not small framed.

Minimalist running is along the same genre. It There are many running shoes that boast minimalism. They seem to work for quite a few runners, but I see the average runner still in cushioned shoes. The jury is still out on these for anything but the gym.

One thing I do remember from my former coach is that he always asked me to look at young children as they ran. He pointed out how relaxed they were and how they just ran naturally without any pretense. I always felt great when i ran and relaxed and  turned off the constant checking on technique.

My one question is: Is there really a running method that you can use that will keep you injury free or lessen your chance of injury? I cannot say yet. We will see. I have quite a few techniques to find and try. After all, I am going to run forever.

 

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Molto Vivace says:

    I read Chi Running years ago when I started running and was having shin splint issues. I swear to you, the shin splints disappeared. I have other foot issues and would love to have a stride analysis and to refine what I’m doing and help avoid other injuries. I haven’t tried the more natural shoes yet since I’m an over-pronator and want to keep some stability.

    1. adriadc says:

      Great to know that the shin splints can be solved with Chi Running. I too have to use shoes for over-pronators. I have yet to do Chi Running but now I think I will give it a try.

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